Current Events!

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Please watch all of my videos from The Saratoga County History Center

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Saratoga County man considered top potato chip historian
Mark Mulholland WNYT
Updated: August 1, 2022 - 6:40 PM
Published: July 29, 2022 - 4:44 PM

Please click below to watch my latest interview!

Please click the link below to listen to interview with WGY Mornings interview with Doug Goudie regarding the Saratoga County History Center exhibit.

My latest exhibit at The Saratoga County history Center


Sharing History to Promote Community
August 4, 2022 
Saratoga County History Center

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Potato chip exhibit to open Saturday

BALLSTON SPA“In the Saratoga Style: Potato Chips and Their Regional Folklore” opens Saturday at Brookside Museum, Saratoga County History Center, 6 Charlton St. The exhibit, which will be on display through Dec. 31, explores the many stories that have claimed to explain the story behind the snack, from disgruntled customers to kitchen mishaps.

The use of the “Saratoga” name to nationally market potato chips is seen through the expansive collection of famed local expert Alan Richer, known as “The Toga Chip Guy.”

The exhibit is open to the public 1 to 5 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. For more information,
go to
https://brooksidemuseum.org.


I have recently been featured in twi Times Union Articles
Please read the articles by clicking the links below!

Article 1 - Vanderbilt helped invent the chip in Saratoga?
Likely a salty myth


Article 2 - Toga Chip Guy makes a second showing on History Channel

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Please read the article in Saratoga Today that features, your's truly, The Toga Chip Guy!

Click Here

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Please watch the latest episode of The History Channel's The Food That Built America, "When The Chips Are Down", season 2, episode 3, where I am prominently featured.

Click Here!

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Read my feature article in "Shorelines" The Saratoga Lake Association News Letter.

Click Here

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Listen to my recent interview on Heart Radio.

Click Here

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Listen To The New History Channel Podcast

After appearing in several episodes of The History Channel's Series "The Food That Built America", I have now been prominently featured in an associated podcast.

Please visit The ACast Site to listen!


Please read my recent interview with Julia Dunn on CBS 6.

Click Here

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Read The Article About Me In Saratoga Today Entitled "Who: Alan Richer, The Toga Chip Guy"

This article was just published today, April 2nd, It starts on Page 3.

Click here to read!


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Watch the latest episode of the History Channel's "The FoodThat Built America "that aired on Natational Potato Chip Day, March 14. Featuring the history of Herman Lay and then rival Fritos!

Click here to watch








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John Karolefski, author of the blog Grocery Stories at:
 
https://www.grocerystories.com/ 

has written a book about grocery shopping. He had requested a quote from me about about chips -- their place in snack history, their popularity, etc.

I had provided him with a quote that I will disclose once his book is published.

Here is that quote!

"Potato chips are more American than apple pie. Compare the shelf space allotted to potato chips and apple pie in your local grocery store"


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Recent Events

On Novemeber 19th 2019, I spoke to the New York Capital Region Elfuns Club at the Hilton Garden Inn in Clifton Park NY, on the History of the Potato Chip.
The club consists of mostly retired General Electric employees.


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The Toga Chip Guy Is On The Air!

I have been interviewed about the history of the potato chip by a California based radio station, Yesterday USA  Radio Networks,  at 10:30pm New York time on Saturday, September 14th.  
Listen here!

KITTY CLOVER POTATO CHIP COMPANY
Established Early To Mid 1900’s

Kitty Clover Factory Tour Brochure


Thanks to Ana Somers of the Douglas County, Nebraska Historical Society. Click the image below to view the entire brochure.

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Kitty Clover POS in store

The Kitty Clover sign and display are located on the left side of this photo.

Thanks to Ana Somers of the Douglas County, Nebraska Historical Society.

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Items From The Harman Collection featuring Kitty Clover

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The following photos and descriptions are courtesy of the Durham Museum
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A building with a sign. It says 'Kitty Clover Potato Chips.' A brick road runs in front of it.
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Company plant at 24th and Pierce Street. Building was constructed by masons from Italy with stone blocks salvaged from the old Douglas County Courthouse. Originally used as a dance hall.
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Company plant at 24th and Pierce Street. Building was constructed by masons from Italy with stone blocks salvaged from the old Douglas County Courthouse. Originally used as a dance hall.
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Company plant at 24th and Pierce Street. Building was constructed by masons from Italy with stone blocks salvaged from the old Douglas County Courthouse. There is a company delivery truck parked in front of the building. Negative is delaminating.
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Company plant at 24th and Pierce Street. Building was constructed by masons from Italy with stone blocks salvaged from the old Douglas County Courthouse. Employees are filling up cans of freshly made potato chips.
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Company plant at 24th and Pierce Street. Building was constructed by masons from Italy with stone blocks salvaged from the old Douglas County Courthouse. Employees making up the batches for potato chips to be made with.
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Company plant at 24th and Pierce Street. Building was constructed by masons from Italy with stone blocks salvaged from the old Douglas County Courthouse. Employees making up the batches for potato chips to be made with.
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Company plant at 24th and Pierce Street. Building was constructed by masons from Italy with stone blocks salvaged from the old Douglas County Courthouse. Employees on the production line filling up bags with potato chips.
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Kitty Clover Potato Chip Company Picnic, Omaha, Nebraska.
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Automobiles driving down a snow road with storefronts on either side. Signs read "Free Vees With Coupon From Kitty Clover", "To East Interstate 80", "To North Interstate 29", "Meadow Gold Ice Cream", "Atlantic, Greenfield, Missouri Valley".
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Automobiles driving down a snow road with storefronts on either side. Signs read "Free Vees With Coupon From Kitty Clover", "To East Interstate 80", "To North Interstate 29", "Meadow Gold Ice Cream", "Atlantic, Greenfield, Missouri Valley".
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Exterior of Fred Lippold's home at 5315 Grant Street. Lippold of Kitty Clover Potato Chips Company.
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A family size bag of Kitty Clover potato chips costs 59 cents
Terry Lippold - September 13, 2009
My father, Harold Lippold revived Kitty Clover in Omaha. It was just at the end of the Depression; he was 18 and could not get a job. He bought a defunct company with the logo; a witch’s cauldron sized copper pot, a case of printed bags, a stapler and a hand potato peeler for $150. He pealed, sliced, cooked, bagged and delivered the bags himself. Nobody knew what potato chips were at that time. He could not sell them so he placed them on consignment by walking to all the local restaurants, bars, theaters etc. He traded 40% of the business to my grandfather, Fred Lippold and 20% to my grandmother Louvana for a 50% interest in their car so he could expand. As he grew the business, his mom became the bookkeeper and his dad quit his job as a pharmacist to build the world's larges potato chip company. They only served nine states and the per capita consumption was about 30 pounds per person. Dad retired at the age of 42. The trade magazines could never figure out why he had such extreme success. It was that he never scrimped on ingredients. Kitty Clover became so large and powerful, he could have his own strain of potato grown in Idaho and have them brought directly to his plant on 24th street in Omaha. He used only corn oil for the best flavor. I remember as a kid standing next to the metal conveyor belt and grabbing the hot chips just after they rose from the oil and moving through a shower of salt. You think they were good from the grocer. I can still taste those hot ones 50 years later!
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The following photos are licensed from The Nebraska Historical Society

Three photos of Kitty Clover Plant in St. Paul, MN. One is at night and one includes a truck in front of the plant. Kitty Clover was owned by Fairmont.

1955 photo of Fairmont ice cream display (two men and two women offering samples of ice cream) and photo of large Snackmobile truck.

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Don Julio, A Direct Descendent Of Kitty Clover

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