Image

Current Events!

Please Like My
Facebook Page

Stacks Image 11



Image
Image

Read the 12866 blog,
With more information about the recent
Beer & Chips Festival!

Click Here



Read My Interview From
The Daily Gazette
from November 9th, 2022.

Click here!


Read My November From
518 Profiles Magazine


Click here!



Please watch all of my videos from
The Saratoga County History Center

Click Here Or The Photo To Visit The Page!


Saratoga County man
considered top
potato chip historian
Mark Mulholland WNYT
Updated: August 1, 2022 - 6:40 PM
Published: July 29, 2022 - 4:44 PM

Please click below to watch my latest interview!


Listen to my interview with
WGY Mornings with Doug Goudie
regarding the Saratoga County History Center exhibit.


My latest exhibit at
The Saratoga County History Center


Image
Image
Image


Potato chip exhibit to open Saturday

The exhibit is open to the public 1 to 5 p.m.
Thursday through Sunday.
For more information,
go to
https://brooksidemuseum.org.


Stacks Image 20

I have recently been featured in two
Times Union Articles
Please read them by clicking the links below!

Article 1 - Vanderbilt helped invent the chip in Saratoga?
Likely a salty myth


Article 2 - Toga Chip Guy makes a second showing on History Channel


Article from Saratoga Today
Featuring, your's truly, The Toga Chip Guy!

Click Here


Stacks Image 31

Watch The History Channel's
The Food That Built America,
"When The Chips Are Down",
season 2, episode 3,
where I am prominently featured.

Click Here!


Read my feature article in
"Shorelines"
The Saratoga Lake Association News Letter.

Click Here

Stacks Image 36

Stacks Image 41

Listen to my recent interview on iHeart Radio.

Click Here


History Channel Podcast

After appearing in several episodes of
The History Channel's Series
"The Food That Built America",
I have now been prominently featured
in an associated podcast.

Please visit The ACast Site to listen!


My recent interview with Julia Dunn on CBS 6.

Click Here

Stacks Image 52

Article About Me In Saratoga Today Entitled
"Who: Alan Richer, The Toga Chip Guy"


April 2nd, It starts on Page 3.

Click here to read!


Stacks Image 60

Stacks Image 63

The History Channel's
"The FoodThat Built America"
that aired on
National Potato Chip Day, March 14.
Featuring the history of Herman Lay
and then rival Fritos!

Click here to watch







Stacks Image 88


Stacks Image 99

PRINGLES POTATO CHIPS

Established Circa 1967

Pringles is an American brand of stackable potato-based chips. Originally developed by Procter & Gamble (P&G) in 1967 and marketed as "Pringle's Newfangled Potato Chips", the brand was sold in 2012 to the current owners, Kellogg's.[1]

As of 2011, Pringles were sold in more than 140 countries.[2] In 2012, Pringles were the fourth most popular snack brand after Lay's, Doritos and Cheetos (all manufactured by Frito-Lay), with 2.2% market share globally

Stacks Image 125
It took a court to decide whether Pringles are potato chips or not…
Chances are, you probably haven’t given much thought to that can of Pringles other than wondering “how do I get the last few potato chips out of the tube without greasing up my arms?”

As it turns out, this salty snack has quite a story. It once was in the middle of a massive controversy that questioned the ingredients and whether the chips were actually potato chips at all.

From 2007 to 2009, the makers of the “once-you-pop-you-can’t-stop” chips stood in front of three different levels of the British judiciary trying to defend the decision that Pringles chips were not — by definition — potato chips.

Here’s how this comically complicated problem started. In the mid-20th century, a tax was born by way of France and England called the value-added or VAT tax. This “consumption tax” started off as a 10 percent tax on all goods bought from a business. More than 20 percent of the world’s tax revenue comes from the value-added tax making it a pretty big deal.

In Britain, most foods are exempt from the value-added tax, except for potato chips or “similar products made from the potato, or from potato flour.” This led to a long, arduous journey to figure out whether or not Pringles (which, by the way, were touted at one time as the “newfangled potato chip“) were actually potato chips. If they were ruled as chips, Pringles’ parent company at the time, Procter & Gamble, would be subject to a 17.5 percent VAT tax.

Procter & Gamble’s initial argument was that, no, Pringles were not potato chips because they didn’t “contain enough potato to have the quality of ‘potatoness.’” (Is that even a word?) They also argued Pringles didn’t resemble the shape of a potato chip and were more along the lines of a “savory snack.”

In 2008, a lower British court agreed and ruled that Pringles were in fact not potato chips, mainly because they contained only 42 percent potato and had “a shape not found in nature.” But just a year later, the Court of Appeal re-examined and reversed that decision, calling Procter & Gamble’s argument that the ingredients of a product don’t define the product “hogwash.”

With that decision, the behemoth corporation had to pay $160 million in taxes, while — begrudgingly — calling their newfangled potato chips, well, potato chips. And that is the story of Pringles and its brief dance with the world of taxes, junk food and British judges.

For the record, Pringles are still considered potato chips and probably always should because … they’re made from potatoes.

In the U.S. alone, there are 34 different flavors of Pringles including Loaded Baked Potato, Memphis BBQ and Pizza.

Source credit: Howstuffworks – go here
RapidWeaver Icon

Made in RapidWeaver